2019 Jeep Wranger Unlimited Rubicon eTorque review: More torque, more efficiency, almost no compromises

The Good The 2019 Jeep Wrangler’s turbocharged and electrified eTorque powertrain is smoother, more powerful and more fuel-efficient than the base V6 for not much more money. The Wrangler remains as rugged and off-road-ready as ever. The Bottom Line For all but the most hardcore enthusiasts, there’s almost no compromise for choosing the 2019 Jeep Wrangler’s 48-volt eTorque upgrade. Be respectful, keep it civil and stay on topic. We delete comments that violate our policy, which we encourage you to read. Discussion threads can be closed at any time at our discretion. We’ve taken a look at pretty much every variant of the new JL-series Jeep Wrangler. We’ve dug into the chassis’ capabilities and tested the off-road prowess and cabin/safety tech. We’ve even tackled the Rubicon Trail in a Wrangler Rubicon. Now, it’s time to take a look at the most interesting new development — well, besides the addition of a diesel, anyway. This Wrangler has Jeep’s new 48-volt, mild-hybrid eTorque engine. Yes, an electrified Jeep.  Does electrification hurt or help the legendary Wrangler? It all depends on what you’re looking for in a...

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This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them. Informa PLC’s registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726. You probably know that motors require more current to start than they do to run. What this means is motors have more heat generated in them when they start than when they are running. It takes time to dissipate the extra heat. The heat can dissipate as the motor runs (the fan in a fan-cooled motor helps dissipate this heat) or as the motor sits in a non-running condition. The important thing is to dissipate the starting heat rather than increase the motor temperature significantly through repeated starts placed too close together. If the cycle of start/stop/start is too short, we call that short-cycling. And it’s deadly to motors. Most manufacturers have starting frequency figures for the motors they build. If you aren’t sure how long to wait between starts, contact the manufacturer for the recommended time. Sometimes, the controls for motor-driven equipment will state the minimum time between starts. Sometimes, the controls will actually limit th...